Over half a million Rohingya people face new perils in the makeshift camps in Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh as the coming cyclone season threatens to wash away the flimsy plastic shelters.

More than 500,000 Rohingyas are now settling in makeshift and spontaneous camps in the Cox’s Bazar area. More than half of them children, thousands separated from their parents – arriving in Bangladesh by foot or by river crossing from Myanmar. Poignantly, from these vantage points many of them are now able to see their former home villages burning in the distance across the border.

ShelterBox Response Team member from the UK, Liz Odell, says, ‘Conditions are dire, with most people living in small shelters made of flimsy black plastic sheeting and bamboo poles. There is little space between the shelters, and the paths between them are a congealing soup of oozing mud. Most of the inhabitants have no possessions and only the clothes that they were wearing when they fled from their villages in Rakhine state. Many are traumatized by their experiences and the loss of loved ones.’

Liz also worries that the sites they are using, on terraces high above rice paddy fields, will be prone to collapse as the cyclone season fast approaches. Liz says,

Much of the area around the camps is rice paddies – they are under water so the Rohingyas are forced to build their shelters on the precipitous slopes of the surrounding hills. Once the cyclone season arrives, these terraces are likely to collapse.

ShelterBox, an international disaster relief agency specializing in emergency shelter for families displaced by conflict and natural disasters, is making arrangements to bring in aid including portable solar lighting, which has helped reduce gender-based violence in refugee camps worldwide. Tools and tarps will help with waterproof shelter construction, and to bring basic comfort to families without any possessions ShelterBox is also aiming to bring in blankets. ShelterBox teams had arrived in Bangladesh in response to the worst flooding for decades, but now find themselves responding to a human flood as well.

Liz and her colleague Jimmy Griffith from New Zealand have visited the two largest camps, Kutupalong and Balukhali. Here, teams of aid workers are working round the clock to install water tanks, wells, washrooms, medical facilities (including a 95 bed field hospital) and child friendly spaces.

But Liz says it is a race against time. ‘The influx has been so monumental and so fast that the facilities become overwhelmed as fast as they are built. One water and sanitation health worker told us that as fast as they dig latrines, they are overflowing and they don’t yet have a system for disposing of the faecal sludge. Imagine the smell. On a positive note, the weather has been dry the last few days and the knee-deep mud is beginning to dry up. The World Health Organization are in a race against time to administer 300,000 cholera vaccinations before the inevitable outbreak of the disease.’

 

Mohammed, Hannah and Nurusaffa’s Story

Liz and Jimmy visited a camp at Unchiprang, a spontaneous settlement which houses a relatively few 28,000 people, yet the sea of black plastic shelters still stretches as far as the eye can see. Liz says ‘We met some of the survivors who settled here a couple of weeks ago, and asked them to tell us a little about themselves.’

‘Shakier Mohammed and his wife Hanna are sharing a small shelter with his sister, Nurusaffa, and her two sons aged 8 and 12 years. Hanna is 5 months pregnant. Nurusaffa’s husband was killed, and their house was set on fire before she managed to flee with her two sons. It took them three hours on foot to reach the border in temperatures of 36 degrees celsius, and then another 2½ hours by boat to cross the River Naf which forms the border between Myanmar and Bangladesh. I asked her what possessions she brought with her and she said ‘nothing’. I asked what she needed and she said ‘food, blankets, water carrier.’

Most of the Rohingyas want to return home but at this time, that seems a remote possibility.

‘There was a bright spot in the middle of the sea of mud and black plastic: a child friendly space. This was an airy, open-sided shelter with colourful floor mats, balloons and decorations. There was space for up to 200 children with a toy corner, an art corner, a library and areas for music and adolescents. The children have dedicated latrines, and are fed water and biscuits while they are there. The children were sat in a square, singing songs. It was gut-wrenchingly poignant – the children’s ability to have fun despite all they have been through, given the right support and surroundings.’

ShelterBox can’t help everyone. We are a small cog in a large wheel here, but we can make a difference to the lives of at least 4,000 families.

NOTES TO EDITORS


  • The photos and videos above are free to use in the context of this press release. Please credit ©ShelterBox.
  • We have expert interviewees in Canada, and can also connect you with our teams in Bangladesh responding to both the flooding and the Rohingya crisis, communications and workload allowing. Please note Bangladesh is EST plus 10 hours. Please contact [email protected] or by calling our office at 647-352-1930
  • ShelterBox relies on the support of generous supporters to fund its vital work. The charity has 17 overseas affiliates, and is the only official project partner of Rotary International. At present ShelterBox has teams in Nepal, Bangladesh, and the Caribbean and is working with partners in Cameroon, the Syrian region and Iraq