Weathering the Storm


We met Lyncoln when he was fixing a friend’s house that was damaged by Hurricane Maria.

He was living in his ShelterBox tent just a short walk away. Before the storm hit, Lyncoln was living in his mother’s house, which was now just a plot of land after Maria had flattened his home.

Lyncoln tells us about that awful night when the hurricane raged for nine hours, and how sometimes it felt like it would never end. He played an integral role for those he sheltered with.

I told everyone to keep calm. I kept talking with no sleep, just kept talking as Maria passed. I was talking 24/7, an old lady was crying, I told her to take it easy and it will be fine.

Picking up the pieces


After the storm, Lyncoln’s house lay flat on the ground, so for the next nine days he stayed with his friend and his wife in their concrete house.

Along with the immediate worries of food, water and shelter other consequences of Maria affected Lyncoln’s daily life

The main challenges we were worried about was what to eat. I am still in my tent on my mother’s plot of land and I have built a shed to wash my clothes, when I get a structure and some aid I will be able to rebuild a house.

Starting to rebuild


Nine months down the line and the walls of the tent are still Lyncoln’s home, but he said it gave him some much-needed independence back.

He hopes to find a job and eventually build a new house so he can settle into a new routine.

This is your support in action. Your donation makes a difference and gives those who have lost everything the ability to rebuild their lives, and the renewed sense of hope for a brighter future.

When I received the tent I felt better, it feels very nice. I give thanks and praise to the people who have donated it. It’s important for someone who wants to explore life on their own to have that time alone.